People

Who We Are

We are an ERC and RCUK funded research team based at UCL and Birkbeck looking at how Earth’s biogeochemical cycles respond to past and present climate change

Full Directory
Project of the Week

 

 

 

Dr Mel Murphy

 

This summer, Emily and I spent nearly three months sampling glacier- and snow-fed rivers draining continuous permafrost in the high Arctic Zackenberg River catchment, NE Greenland. Rivers play an important role in the long-term carbon cycle, transporting dissolved and particulate material from the chemical and physical breakdown of rocks on the continents to the oceans. These ‘weathering’ processes can both release and remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, and we don’t know which of these processes dominates overall in Arctic river systems. This has huge implications for understanding whether Arctic rivers are acting as a source or sink for atmospheric CO2, and therefore, how weathering in the Arctic impacts the long-term carbon cycle and climate.

 

Investigative Team

All members, including PhD and Masters Researchers, can be contacted either via this website or their institutional contact addresses 

Dr Philip Pogge von Srtrandmann

Dr Philip Pogge von Srtrandmann

Principal Investigator

I am interested in how the Earth’s biogeochemical cycles respond to changes in climate. In particular, how chemical weathering (the main natural removal process of atmospheric CO2) responds to climatic warming and cooling. This is important both for determining how the future climate will evolve due to anthropogenic warming, but also if we can enhance these natural processes to artificially remove CO2 on faster timescales.

 CV 

Publication List

Dr Mel Murphy

Dr Mel Murphy

Postdoctoral Researcher

My research focuses on examining the interplay between terrestrial weathering processes and (i) ocean oxygenation and redox chemistry (ii) atmospheric CO2, and ultimately (iii) the Earth’s climate system over modern and geological timescales. In particular, I am interested in silicate, carbonate and sulfide mineral weathering at high-latitude glaciated and permafrost-dominated Arctic regions.

To do this, I apply non-traditional isotopic, elemental and mineralogical tools to better understand geochemical cycling in riverine/estuarine and marine environments

Dr David Wilson

Dr David Wilson

Postdoctoral Researcher

As a geologist and earth scientist, my research uses isotopic and geochemical measurements to investigate past changes in ocean chemistry, ocean circulation, continental weathering, and polar ice sheets, and how these interacted with Earth’s climate evolution. Evidence from such paleoclimate studies provides an invaluable context for understanding the present and future climate system

Dr Ying Shields-Zhou

Postdoctoral Researcher

A Word

 

From Our Principal

 

” For the first time in human history, we are capable of predicting the future climate. The problem is that our own activities will cause us to live in interesting times. 

 

– Philip Pogge von Strandmann

Fuencisla Canadas

PhD Researcher

Project Title

Paleoceanographic context of organic matter deposition on the Yangtze Craton, South China during the Ediacaran Period

Fieke Mulder

PhD Researcher

Project Title

Elucidating mineral dissolution and precipitation mechanisms.

 

Ze Tao

PhD Researcher

Project Title

Using boron isotopes as a tracer of habitat and diet.

Joe Sumesar-Rai

PhD Researcher

Project Title

Using boron isotopes as a tracer of habitat and diet.

Past Members

Tianchen He

PhD Researcher

Lisa Friberg

MSCI

Examining lithium isotopes as a tracer of silicate weathering through a river time-series

Lara Cosford

MSCi

Examining lithium isotopes as a tracer of silicate weathering rates. 

Chloe Tooley

Masters

 “Enhanced weathering CO2 sequestration experiments at 4°C”

Opportunities

If you are interested in research in these areas, please contact me..

I welcome enquiries from people wishing to undertake research in:

  1. past variations in biogeochemical cycles, largely related to inorganic and organic responses and controls of the carbon cycle. 
  2. Understanding modern weathering processes, using natural analogues of past processes.
  3. Laboratory experiments to constrain and quantify isotopic responses to chemical weathering of different materials.
  4. Artificial enhancement of natural processes to rapidly sequester atmospheric or oceanic carbon.

If you wish to undertake a PhD, and are a UK/EU student, then funding is best sought via the University of London’s NERC Doctoral Training Programme (DTP) 

If you are a non-EU student, then the most likely funding course is via UCL’s overseas research scholarships. If you are a Chinese national, then funding can be obtained via the Chinese Scholarship Council. 

Postdoctoral positions are advertised on the jobs page when available. 

If you wish to apply for a research fellowship (e.g. NERC ) then please contact me.