Past Climate Change

and its implications for today

Quantifying the link between weathering and past CO2 levels

“Past Climate Change helps us to understand how the earth has stayed habitable throughout the climate challenges of the past and how it may face the climate challenges of the future.”

Philip Pogge von Strandmann

People

The research team based at UCL and Birkbeck combines a wide range of interests and expertise.

Blog

What are we doing? What are other people doing? Some lighthearted posts and some news. The blog is a collection of what we do.

Projects

An overview of the different project (ERC, Royal Society, Nerc) linked to this research

Publications

A comprehensive bibliography of all the papers and research output produced throughout the different projects.

Science

A collection of articles and short blurbs regarding the basic science and the way it has been used throughout the project and the website.

Featured Paper

Global climate stabilisation by chemical weathering during the Hirnantian glaciation

Blog

Look what the new ELEMENTS is about….

Look what the new ELEMENTS is about….

Lithium was created during the Big Bang at about 13.8 Ga. Lithium is concentrated in Earth’s upper continental crust and in 124 mineral species, the greatest mineralogical diversity being found in pegmatites. Lithium occurs naturally in two isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, which are readily fractionated, thus becoming sensitive to geological and environmental processes. Closed-basin brines (58%) and pegmatites plus related granites (26%) constitute the main sources of exploitable lithium worldwide. Life as we know it at the start of the 21stcentury would not be possible without lithium as it is used in a myriad of applications ranging from lithium-ion batteries to medicine.

Why is the Earth Habitable?

A talk given by Dr Pogge von Strandmann at University College London. 

Events

Sedgwick Club Conference: How does the Earth recover from extreme climate perturbations?

Event information:
13th March 2020 at 14:40
University of Cambridge – Tilley Lecture Theatre, Department of Earth Sciences, Downing Street
Part of the Sedgwick Club Talk Series