HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters

HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters are used to filter the air going into clean labs and their laminar flow hoods. They are generally protected by pre-filters, which remove the worst of the airbourne particles, so that they don’t clog the HEPAs. 

With our lab building works hopefully finally complete, it’s been time to change the HEPAs, which have become clogged with dust from the building works. The two pictures show the old and new HEPAs within the grey plastic case. The white HEPA (in the plastic bag) is the new filter, while the black HEPA shows how much dirt has been collected on the filter over the last two years. Perhaps we should charge the city of London for cleaning up their air for them!

Related Articles

Dear Scientist, Science Enthusiast and Citizen,   I hope you and your loved ones are fine in these troubled times.    I am sending you an unusual message about the ongoing fierce battle around the EU’s future research budget.   At the European Council summit in July,...

Look what the new ELEMENTS is about….

Look what the new ELEMENTS is about….

Lithium was created during the Big Bang at about 13.8 Ga. Lithium is concentrated in Earth’s upper continental crust and in 124 mineral species, the greatest mineralogical diversity being found in pegmatites. Lithium occurs naturally in two isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, which are readily fractionated, thus becoming sensitive to geological and environmental processes. Closed-basin brines (58%) and pegmatites plus related granites (26%) constitute the main sources of exploitable lithium worldwide. Life as we know it at the start of the 21stcentury would not be possible without lithium as it is used in a myriad of applications ranging from lithium-ion batteries to medicine.

Look what the new ELEMENTS is about….

Look what the new ELEMENTS is about….

Lithium was created during the Big Bang at about 13.8 Ga. Lithium is concentrated in Earth’s upper continental crust and in 124 mineral species, the greatest mineralogical diversity being found in pegmatites. Lithium occurs naturally in two isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, which are readily fractionated, thus becoming sensitive to geological and environmental processes. Closed-basin brines (58%) and pegmatites plus related granites (26%) constitute the main sources of exploitable lithium worldwide. Life as we know it at the start of the 21stcentury would not be possible without lithium as it is used in a myriad of applications ranging from lithium-ion batteries to medicine.

0 Comments

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Stay Up to Date With The Latest News & Updates

Join Our Newsletter

 

Follow Us

On the usual platforms